Interview with the artist: Tomás Barceló Castelá

Interview with the artist: Tomás Barceló Castelá


To start us off, can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I am Tomás Barceló Castelá, half French from Montauban and half Spanish from Mallorca. I studied Fine Arts, specializing in Sculpture, at the Sant Jordi Faculty of the University of Barcelona, and there I had the honor of learning from J.S. Jassans. For more than fifteen years I was a high school teacher and I enjoyed it very much. In 2014, I left teaching to try a path focused on my work as a sculptor, and I have been working on several projects of all kinds, including international films (Asura, Maleficent II, Dune 2020,…). Lately I have been focusing on the creation of personal work, exploring new themes and new paths.

How did you get into sculpture? Was it a lifelong interest?

I have always been a sculptor, but I didn’t know it until I was 21. As a child I always played building things with clay, with Legos, with cardboard and with anything I could find. I played at constructing sets and props for films that were filmed in my imagination. My passion was cinema, but my day-to-day work was building things. Fortunately, my adolescence was not very social and I never stopped playing (although I did it on the sly). I didn’t stop playing with clay until college. I started my career with cinema as a goal, but in the third year I understood that sculpture was my path, that it had always been my path. I abandoned my dreams of being a filmmaker and dedicated the last two years of university to sculpture with all the intensity I was capable of.

Setna Tek – image © Gallery Ex Machina

Your artwork is a magical intersection of classical antiquity and futuristic steampunk. Are there any artists, styles or visual references that you draw inspiration from?

The Faculty of Fine Arts, where I studied, was actually an academy of conceptual art, where they played superficially with ideas of postmodern philosophy. I tried to believe it; but every now and then, secretly, I would go to the library and devour books on archaic sculpture. There was something in the Truth of ancient sculpture that allowed me a reprieve from the emptiness I felt in the classrooms. My fascination with hieratic sculpture has not ceased to grow. I believe that ancient art is my main source of inspiration.

My problem, during the 20 years that followed my secret trips to the library, was believing that the language of traditional sculpture must be linked to traditional themes. As if, to make a classical sculpture, I could only make naked figures; or if I wanted to make something of Egyptian-style, I had to make writings, and so on. For too long, I was focused only on the language of sculpture, and I forgot the content.

It took 20 years of dead-end roads, frustrations, and changing lives several times to understand that I could use traditional language to tell the things that had always interested me. I reclaimed the films I shot in my imagination as a child, and played again. Suddenly, the two paths came together: the path of the search for formal rigor and sculptural language; and the path of fantasy, science fiction, and the creation of worlds.

In my head, Joan Rebull, Spielberg, Wingelmo de Modena, Jim Henson, J.R.R. Tolkien, Lucca della Robia, Michael Ende, Wetta, and many other artists (many of them old and anonymous) mix together to discuss and propose crazy things that sometimes lead somewhere.

Robot Vienuolis – image © Gallery Ex Machina

“There was something in the Truth of ancient sculpture that allowed me a reprieve from the emptiness I felt in the classrooms. I believe that ancient art is my main source of inspiration.”

We can also see an intriguing touch of steampunk, weaving through your collection. What part of the Steampunk genre appeals to you?

I got to know steampunk thanks to some fans, who started to define me as a steampunk artist. The steampunk world was for me a breath of fresh air in the cultural environment I knew. The creative freedom of the steampunk community is like nothing I have ever known before.

I know that there are dozens of classifications included in the concept of “steampunk”, but I prefer the open idea of anachronism as a creative principle. The world that the steampunk community discovered for me has nothing to do with gears or the Victorian world, but with a deep knowledge of culture and history and the freedom to create whatever you want from it.

The figures in your collection all look like they belong to an alternate reality, or a fantasy world. They undoubtedly tell a unique story with their presence. How do you imagine these figures in the beginning? How do the names emerge? Does each of the pieces have a story behind the surface?

I believe that sculpture is the art of presence. When you look at a painting, you look at a window opening to another world; the sculpture comes to look at you. Sculpture shares space and time with the viewer, and that is what makes it so powerful. That’s why I don’t try so much to tell stories as I try to create powerful presences, each in its own way. The fact that a small robot girl looks at you more intensely than you look at her, is fascinating to me.

I try to make each piece have its own identity, and although for some of them, I imagine small fragments of stories, I don’t find it necessary to tell them in words. I am a sculptor and what I have to say, I say it through sculptures. The only small literary pleasure I allow myself are the names, which I invent with the help of minority languages and sounds that I like. I look for credible and distant names.

I am also fascinated by the fact that they treat futuristic themes as if they were really antiques.

Princesa Dormida – image © Gallery Ex Machina and Tomás Barceló Castelá

“When you look at a painting, you look at a window opening to another world; the sculpture comes to look at you. Sculpture shares space and time with the viewer, and that is what makes it so powerful.”

Let’s talk about the technical side of your sculptures for a moment. You transform common materials and recycled pieces into fantastical icons. How is your creation process?

I consider myself a traditional sculptor to the core. I usually work by modelling in clay and carving in plaster. When I opened up to new themes a few years ago, that pushed me to open up to new ways of working as well. I naturally began to add found objects to my pieces and to explore new materials and new ways of working.

Now I am very focused on polychromy. It is something that interested me from the beginning but I never developed it sufficiently. In each piece, I try to find an answer to how shape and color relate to express something.

Do you use models while sculpting, or do the figures come from your imagination?

I really like working from scratch. Having to adapt to something that comes from your head forces you to learn. The effort required is very creative and the model’s personality pushes me to do things that I would not do alone. La Princesa Dormida, Vinna, or Alberich, would have been impossible without the models that helped me.

Other times I prefer to work without an external reference. That helps me to depersonalize the sculpture a lot and it can more easily acquire an air of icon or archetype.

Teophilus (front), Robot Hand (back) and Dark Lilith (right) – image © Gallery Ex Machina

Any new collections or plans for you in the near future?

There were several projects underway before the pandemic, but now, no one knows what will happen. I have two possible film projects that I cannot talk about and two ambitious personal projects that I have been dreaming about for some years now. But for the moment I am still exploring and enjoying my little creations in my workshop.

All images of the artworks belong to artist Tomás Barceló Castelá.


To find out more about the artist:


Entrevista con el artista: Tomás Barceló Castelá

Para empezar, ¿puedes contarnos un poco de ti?

Soy Tomás Barceló Castelá, medio francés de Montauban y medio español de Mallorca. Estudié Bellas Artes, especialidad de Escultura, en la Facultad Sant Jordi de la Universidad de Barcelona, y allí tuve el honor de aprender de J.S. Jassans. Durante más de quince años fui profesor de secundaria y lo disfruté muchísimo. En 2014 dejé la docencia para intentar un camino centrado en mi trabajo de escultor y he estado trabajando en varios proyectos de toda clase, entre ellos películas internacionales (Asura, Maléfica II, Dune 2020,…). Últimamente me he centrado en la creación de obra personal, explorando nuevos temas y nuevos caminos.

¿Cómo llegaste a hacer escultura?¿Fue un interés que tuviste toda tu vida?

Yo he sido siempre escultor, pero no lo supe hasta los 21 años. De niño jugaba siempre a construir cosas con plastilina, con legos, con cartón y con todo lo que encontrara. Jugaba a construir decorados y props para películas que se filmaban en mi imaginación. Mi pasión era el cine, pero mi día a día era la construcción de cosas. Afortunadamente mi adolescencia no fue muy social y nunca dejé de jugar (aunque lo hacía a escondidas). No dejé de jugar con plastilina hasta la universidad. Empecé la carrera con el cine como objetivo, pero en el tercer curso comprendí que la escultura era mi camino, que siempre lo había sido. Abandoné mis sueños de cineasta y dediqué los dos últimos años de universidad a la escultura con toda la intensidad de la que fui capaz.

Setna Tek – image © Gallery Ex Machina

Tu obra es una intersección mágica de la antigüedad clásica y el steampunk futurista. ¿Hay artistas / estilos / historias / referencias visuales de los que te inspires?

La Facultad de Bellas Artes en la que estudié era en realidad una academia de arte conceptual, en la que jugaban de manera superficial con ideas de filosofía postmoderna. Yo intentaba creérmelo; pero de vez en cuando, a escondidas, iba a la biblioteca a devorar libros sobre escultura arcaica. Había algo en la Verdad de la escultura antigua que me permitía descansar del vacío que sentía en las aulas. Mi fascinación por la escultura hierática no ha dejado de crecer. Creo que el arte antiguo es mi principal fuente de inspiración.

Mi problema, durante los 20 años que siguieron a mis escapadas secretas a la biblioteca, fue creer que el lenguaje de la escultura tradicional debía estar ligada a temas tradicionales. Como si para hacer escultura clásica tuviera solo pudiera hacer gente desnuda; o si quisiera hacer algo de estilo egipcio tuviera que hacer escribas, etc. Demasiado tiempo estuve centrado solo en el lenguaje escultórico, y olvidé el contenido.

Necesité 20 años de caminos sin salida, frustración, cambiar de vida varias veces para entender que podía usar el lenguaje tradicional para contar las cosas que me habían interesado siempre. Recuperé las películas que filmaba en mi imaginación de niño y volví a jugar. De golpe dos caminos se unieron: el camino de la búsqueda del rigor formal y el lenguaje escultórico; y el camino de la fantasía, la ciencia ficción y la creación de mundos.

En mi cabeza se mezclan Joan Rebull, Spielberg, Wingelmo de Módena, Jim Henson, J.R.R. Tolkien, Lucca della Robia, Michael Ende, Wetta, y muchísimos artistas más (muchos de ellos antiguos y anónimos) para discutir entre ellos y proponer locuras que a veces llevan a algún sitio.

Robot Vienuolis – image © Gallery Ex Machina

“Había algo en la Verdad de la escultura antigua que me permitía descansar del vacío que sentía en las aulas. Creo que el arte antiguo es mi principal fuente de inspiración.”

Vemos también detalles steampunk entrelazados de manera intrigante en tu colección. ¿Qué es lo que te atrae del Steampunk?

Yo conocí el steampunk gracias a unos seguidores que empezaron a definirme como artista steampunk. El mundo steampunk fue para mí una bocanada de aire fresco en el ambiente cultural que yo conocía. La libertad creativa de la comunidad steampunk no se parece a nada que yo hubiera conocido antes.

Sé que hay decenas de clasificaciones englobadas en el concepto “steampunk”, pero prefiero la idea abierta de la anacronía como principio creador. El mundo que me descubrió la comunidad steampunk no tiene nada que ver con engranajes o el mundo victoriano, sino con un conocimiento profundo de la cultura y de la historia y con la libertad para crear lo que te apetezca a partir de ello.

Las figuras de tu colección parecen pertenecer a una realidad alternativa o un mundo de fantasía. Sin duda cuentan una historia única con su presencia. ¿Desde un primer momento cómo imaginas estas figuras? ¿Cómo surgen los nombres? ¿Cada una de las piezas tiene una historia detrás?

Creo que la escultura es el arte de la presencia. Cuando miras un cuadro, miras una ventana abierta hacia otro mundo; la escultura viene a verte a ti. La escultura comparte el espacio y el tiempo con el espectador, y eso es lo que la hace tan poderosa. Por eso no intento tanto contar escenas como crear presencias poderosas, cada una a su manera. El hecho de que una niña robot de pequeño tamaño te mire con más intensidad que tú a ella me parece fascinante.

Intento que cada pieza tenga su propia identidad, y aunque para algunas de ellas imagino pequeños fragmentos de historias no me parece necesario contarlas con palabras. Soy escultor y lo que tengo que decir lo hago mediante esculturas. El único pequeño placer literario que me permito son los nombres, que invento con la ayuda de lenguas minoritarias y sonidos que me gustan. Busco que tengan nombres creíbles y lejanos.

También me fascina el hecho de tratar temas futuristas como si en realidad fueran antigüedades.

Princesa Dormida – image © Gallery Ex Machina and Tomás Barceló Castelá

“Cuando miras un cuadro, miras una ventana abierta hacia otro mundo; la escultura viene a verte a ti. La escultura comparte el espacio y el tiempo con el espectador, y eso es lo que la hace tan poderosa.”

Hablemos por un momento del lado tecnicismo de tus esculturas. Transformas materiales comunes y piezas recicladas en iconos fantásticos. ¿Cómo es el proceso de creación?

Me considero un escultor tradicional hasta la médula. Habitualmente trabajo modelando en arcilla y tallando en escayola. Cuando hace unos años me abrí a tratar nuevos temas, eso me empujó a abrirme también a nuevas formas de trabajar. De forma natural empecé a añadir objetos encontrados a mis piezas y a explorar nuevos materiales y nuevas formas de trabajar.

Ahora estoy muy centrado en la policromía. Es algo que me interesó desde el principio pero que nunca llegué a desarrollar satisfactoriamente. En cada pieza intento encontrar respuesta a cómo se relacionan la forma y el color para expresar algo.

¿Las figuras provienen de tu imaginación o utilizas modelos cuando esculpes?

Me gusta muchísimo trabajar del natural. Tener que adaptarte a algo que está fuera de tu cabeza te obliga a aprender. El esfuerzo necesario es muy creativo y la personalidad del modelo me empuja a hacer cosas que yo solo no haría. La Princesa Dormida, Vinna, o Alberich, habrían sido imposible sin los modelos que me ayudaron.

Otras veces prefiero trabajar sin un referente externo. Eso me ayuda a despersonalizar mucho la escultura y puede adquirir más fácilmente un aire de icono o arquetipo.

Teophilus (front), Robot Hand (back) and Dark Lilith (right) – image © Gallery Ex Machina

¿Alguna nueva colección o planes para el futuro futuro cercano?

Había varios proyectos en marcha antes de la pandemia pero ahora nadie sabe qué va a pasar. Tengo dos posibles proyectos cinematográficos de los que no puedo hablar y dos proyectos personales ambiciosos con los que llevo soñando desde hace algunos años. Pero de momento sigo explorando y disfrutando con mis pequeñas creaciones en mi taller.


Para saber más sobre el artista: